Angkor Wat


The World Heritage Site of 80 Hindu and Buddhist temples known collectively as the Angkor Archaeological Park is the Eighth Wonder of the World. From 879 C.E. to 1431 C.E., a succession of 41 kings built these grand monuments to honor themselves and the various gods to whom they owed their position.

The Park is roughly twice the size of the island of Manhattan in New York City and exceeds in size all other religious precincts built throughout history. The temple of Angkor Wat itself is the largest religious building on earth. In addition to the scores of majestic temples, other constructions of massive waterworks including irrigation ditches, grand canals and huge reservoirs were also built to capture the annual floodwaters of the Mekong River and seasonal monsoon rains.

The structures of Angkor Wat have been well documented in an ever-growing number of coffee table art books, but seldom in black and white infrared, as only a small handful of photographers work in this medium. Infrared photography has been a specialty of mine for over 25 years. The photos are atmospheric in the extreme- beguiling, haunting and ethereal. The buildings are well suited to this photographic medium, as their setting lies deep within the Cambodian jungle, its lush foliage framing the monuments and invoking a deep sense of romantic mystery.


Thommanon_west_arch

The Infrared Process


At the turn of the nineteenth century, Sir William Herschel (1738-1822), a German-born astronomer, was searching for suitable glass for colored filters to be fitted on his telescope. He needed a color that would transmit a maximum of light and a minimum of heat. Using a glass prism to refract light from the sun into its component colors, he moved thermometers through the spectrum. The temperatures increased as the thermometers were moved from violet to red and reached a maximum in the dark region beyond the red end of the visible spectrum. The Royal Society of London was notified of this discovery in 1800. In his writings, Herschel referred to this phenomenon as invisible light.


Portfolio


Prints are available

Angkor Thomman

Angkor Wat

Angkor Front

Angkor Front View

Angkor Wat

Angkor Front

Angkor Baksei Cha.jpg

Angkor Wat

Angkor Baksei Cha.jpg


Preah-Khan

Angkor Wat

Preah-Khan

Chau-Say-Tevoda

Angkor Wat

Chau-Say-Tevoda

Angkor Thomman

Angkor Wat

Angkor Thomman


A Message From The Artist

Photography is both documentary and creative in the sense that it captures objects in time and presents them in an altered or accentuated way meant to convey a certain feeling about the subject matter. An example of a photographic document is a mug shot; An example of a creative photograph is a portrait.

So often, objects in our lives don't communicate anything of the sacred in the world, having lost their magic to the innumerable distractions which surround us. Flora, fauna, the land and sky, architecture and even people become banal in every sense. Artistic photography is a creative method of re-animating things with a new energy capable of awakening our emotions about them.

CONTACT

Contact us

Ventura, CA US

roger@angkorart.com